Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Hey, Dahlia Growers, Who's Got Flowers?

Baby red in pot 6/29/11
Here in the Pacific Northwest, where spring has been late and cool, the dahlias are up and growing beautifully now. But we suspect that some of you folks who live in milder climes may already be enjoying dahlia flowers.

We'd love to know how your dahlias are doing, and to receive photos if you'd like to send them. It would be nice, in some of our summer blogs, to include comments about the challenges you've faced, your biggest successes, your favorite dahlias, and why you like them best.

As a blogger for Lynch Creek Farm, I'm dahlia-challenged. We live on a slope with a large pond behind our house, so in addition to all the slugs (native and introduced) for which our part of the world is famous, we've got huge herds of snails that march their way up from the damp edges of the pond into the garden. Every year these dahlia pests managed to eat my dahlias as they emerged in the spring. Finally I gave up; why kill a perfectly nice dahlia tuber and provide a meal for freeloading slugs and snails?

Baby Red
This year, I decided I couldn't really blog dahlias without growing dahlias, at least a couple of dahlias. I chose Baby Red, a mignon single, which, if it survived, would go with the geraniums and other flowers on my front porch. So far I've foiled the slugs and snails by planting my dahlia tubers in pots and a disgusting killer kind of slug-killer that I wouldn't dream of putting out into the garden where birds or the neighbor's cat might get into it. So much for my organic principles. Baby Red is about five inches high, surviving far beyond the point where any dahlia of mine has managed to survive up to now.

That's my dahlia story so far. What's yours? You can use the comment box OR (especially if you have photos to share) e-mail cmaddux@hcc.net. We look forward to hearing from you.


1 comment:

William said...

I love that flower. I actually have it in my garden. I always make sure that I spray insecticides to avoid any damage.

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